The Magus of Strovolos


The Magus of Strovolos by Kyriacos C. MarkidesFull Title: The Magus of Strovolos: The Extraordinary World of a Spiritual Healer
Author: Kyriacos C. Markides
Publisher: Arkana (1990) [First published by Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd. 1985]
Number of Pages: 222
How long it took me to read: 3 weeks, 4 days
Where I bought this book: Amazon.co.uk
ISBN: 0-14-019034-1

Like a Moth to a Flame

I first learned about Daskalos and the work he was doing in Cyprus when I was living in England. I contacted the group continuing his work in London and asked them how I could learn more about their philosophies and practices. They suggested I start with this book.

Get it on AmazonGet it at Barnes & NobleGet it at Alibris UK

Favorite Five

Whittling 18 down to 5…I propose that the top 5 quotes from this book are:

5. “ ‘When, then, can we have memories of past lives without a disturbance on the present self-conscious personality?’ I asked.

“ ‘Each Researcher of Truth will learn the way slowly and patiently. At first we will feel our past incarnations intuitively until full memory is recovered. The memories will come as the present self-conscious personality is more closely in atunement with the permanent personality. Then, like good actors, we will be able to remember the roles we have performed. The Earth is the theater within which every one of us plays his various roles in order to learn and progress towards perfection. When we look back without being disturbed at what we see, it is time and safe to remember. Before we can safely remember, we must first transcend the idea of Good and Evil. In the meantime Divine Mercy has shut the door on past memories in order to give us a chance to proceed in our path without the interference of past imperfections and weaknesses.’ ” (p.110)

4. “He explained that the Akashic Records is another word for Universal Memory. Whatever exists, existed and will exist is imprinted in this pan-universal supercomputer. Furthermore, a single atom contains within it all the knowledge of the cosmos. It is, therefore, possible, by concentrating on a single atom, to acquire information of something or some event that took place in the distant past. It is done by entering into the Akashic Records just like a scholar enters into a library to investigate a particular issue. But like the scholar, the mystic must have prior knowledge of the subject he is investigating. Otherwise he will not be able to acquire any information. For example, if one is to use the Akashic Records to obtain information on nineteenth-century physics, one must be familiar with physics to begin with.” (p.32)

3. “ ‘All illnesses,’ Daskalos began after he conducted the short prayer, ‘are the result of psychonoetic conditions. You may wonder about the effects of viruses. As medical science shows, microorganisms and viruses exist in abundant supply within the body of every human being. Why then are some of us more immune to these organisms whereas others are so vulnerable? The etheric energy needed to keep the body in balance drops considerably when we vibrate improperly. A certain amount of etheric vibrations, say one hundred, is required for the Holy Spirit to create the cells, tissues and various organs of the material body. Our etheric energy is depleted when our desired and thoughts are such that create in us the vibrations of anxiety, depression, stubbornness, anger, hatred and similar morbid emotions. Therefore, we may only have eighty or sixty units out of the one hundred that we hypothetically need as etheric vitality to keep the body in balance. Automatically we noticed that the most sensitive parts of our body begin to manifest the lack of an adequate supply of vitality. When an individual gets sufficient amounts of etheric energy through proper nutrition, breathing and way of living his personality should enjoy full health. The aura of such an individual radiates over a large area and gets absorbed often by those who need it. Such individuals benefit from the mere presence of a Researcher of Truth.

“ ‘You are probably aware that certain people generate in us positive vibrations whereas others may generate the exact opposite. The joy we experience in the presence of certain people is the result of an abundant supply of etheric vitality they emanate. Others who lack in vitality draw from our own reservoir or etheric energy. A Researcher of Truth who wants to be of service must keep his aura clear and radiating. Even when he feels drained by a fellow human being who absorbs from his vitality he should not reject him. These are the people that need our help most.’ ” (pp.177-8)

2. “ ‘People get possessed by elementals which they themselves create as a result of their weaknesses. Only in rare cases do I encounter possession by beings who reside in the etheric world. For example many young men in Cyprus end up in the asylum after creating powerful elementals from obsessive masturbation over the image of a woman. Such an elemental sucks from the etheric of the individual in order to prolong its life within the etheric counterpart of the gross material world. This may lead to insanity. The “sucking of blood” of the so-called vampires is in reality etheric matter. The same situation occurs more rarely when human entities behave as if they were vampires.’ ” (pp.163-4)

…and my pick for the No.1 quote is…

1. “After Daskalos returned to his armchair and was getting ready to continue our discussion I asked him whether the affliction of that man was due to karmic debts.

“ ‘All illnesses are due to Karma,’ Daskalos replied. ‘It is either the result of your own debts or the debts of others you love.’

“ ‘I can understand paying for one’s own Karma but what does it mean paying the Karma of someone you love?’ I asked.

“ ‘What do you think Christ meant,’ Daskalos said, ‘when he urged us to bear one another’s burdens?’

“ ‘Karma,’ Daskalos explained, ‘has to be paid off in one way or another. This is the universal law of balance. So when we love someone, we may assist him in paying part of his debt. But this,’ he said, ‘is possible only after that person has received his ‘lesson’ and therefore it would not be necessary to pay his debt in full. When most of the Karma has been paid off someone else can assume the remaining burden and relieve the subject from the pain. When we are willing to do that,’ Daskalos continued, ‘the Logos will assume nine-tenths of the remaining debt and we would actually assume only one-tenth. Thus the final debt that will have to be paid would be much less and the necessary pain would be considerably reduced. These are not arbitrary percentages,’ Daskalos insisted, ‘but part of the nature of things.’ ” (p.66)

New Words

Words are wondrous creatures. Put them together and they paint a picture. Rearrange them and the scene changes. But to be able to see what they are saying, we must first know what they mean.

New Word: sophistry (noun)

Definition (Source: WordBook iPhone App): a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone
Synonyms: sophism, sophistication
Origins: Old French ‘sophistrie’; Latin ‘sophista’; Ancient Greek ‘σοφιστἠϛ’ I am wise
As in: “Things are so clear around us in our society that this sophistry is rather superficial.” (p.63)

New Word: ebullient (adjective)

Definition (Source: WordBook iPhone App): joyously unrestrained
Synonyms: exuberant, high-spirited
Origins: 1599; Latin ‘ebullientem’ boiling; present participle of ‘ebullire’ to spout out, burst out; from ‘e-‘ out + ‘bullire’ to bubble; figurative sense of enthusiastic is first recorded 1664.
As in: “Instead of a half-mad menacing sorcerer I encountered an ebullient and deeply religious person with a high sense of humor whose hobbies included painting and classical music.” (pp.1-2)

New Word: lamasary (noun)

Definition (Source: WordBook iPhone App): a monastery for lamas
Origins: French ‘lamaserie’; irregular formation from lama
As in: “Your obsession with finding the Truth led you to wander from one lamasary to another. In your present incarnation your lamasary is the university where you now teach.” (p.8)

New Word: hierophany (noun)

Definition (Source: Student Reader): an event in which one sensorily experiences a manifestation of the sacred; a hierophany can be seen (i.e., a star or an angel), felt (i.e., extispicy), smelled (i.e., the aroma of a burnish bush or offering), heard (i.e., the voice of God) or tasted (i.e., imbibing a special potion) and any combination thereof, and it can be an interruption in time (i.e., events in time being shown to Ebenezer Scrooge); it is a sensory experience, and thus anything in nature can be a hierophany, even the cosmos in its entirety.
Origins: (Source: The Free Dictionary): from the Greek roots ‘ἱερός’ (hieros) sacred or holy; ‘φαίνειν’ (phainein) to reveal or to bring to light
As in: “ ‘If you are honest with yourself,’ I continued, ‘it is impossible to be exposed to Daskalos for a long time and not wonder about the possibility that the observable empirical world may be indeed a hierophany, an expression of a higher reality hidden from ordinary consciousness.’ ” (p.218)

Conversation with the Reader

While I read, I write, and as I write, I read. Here’s some of what I wrote while I read this book:

“I don’t often read books more than once. Sometimes I keep a book for years after I’ve read it if it made a strong impression, but it’s very few to which I return. I’m revisiting Daskalos during these last few weeks of 2011. I don’t know exactly why. I know that this is one of my favorite books in the whole world. I know that it’s one of the first books I wanted to share with you, ever since UBR was born. I don’t know why now is the time for a reunion with Daskalos and Kyriacos, but I feel a profound yearning to reconnect.”

The Magus of Strovolos: Chapter 3 - Elementals“It’s remarkable to me; it’s beautiful to me how a book can speak in different tones to the same reader, depending on when it’s given a voice. In the midst of my favorite chapter, my most favorite of chapters on this whole journey (and the one that the author has graciously allowed us to share with you here on the site), Daskalos mentions Paganini. Kyriacos insists on knowing how Daskalos performs his miracles, and Daskalos rebuts with a simple question. He asks whether Kyriacos would demand to know how a violin virtuoso does what he does. Why? How? How long? How much? How?

“Setting the lesson aside for a moment, I had to hear what Paganini sounded like. I’ve been thirsting for violin music for the last year, and the best I’ve done is drown myself in a familiar bath of Vivaldi and all his seasons. So imagine my wonder when, while sitting at the office in the room we’ve coined The Water Room, it suddenly filled with violins—beautiful etheric violins fluttering around me, darting between my eyelashes and floating through my curls. Today, I found serenity at work, all because of a little book that I let speak to me once again.”

“My favorite parts of this book were and still remain, the scenes where Daskalos speaks. He reminds me of a teacher I once knew. He inspires me to strive to experience a similar reality to the one he describes to his incredulous audiences. After I finished reading this book for the first time, I went online to see how much it would cost to visit him in Nicosia and spend some time there, learning. I found out that he had passed away some years before this book crossed my path. That made me sad. It felt as though the jewel I thought I had been holding in my hand had suddenly turned to sand, and was seeping away between my fingers. It was, in the end, a lesson of the impermanence of the physical world. The words however, have remained and continue to resonate.”

“I don’t really know anything about the bible. I say this wishing I knew more, while at the same time resenting what I do know. I studied in a Catholic school system for the first 10 years of my academic life. I said prayers each day and attended classes in church basements. I don’t remember the details, but I remember I hated every minute of it.

“As a result, I don’t know how capable I am of appreciating the content of this book that directly addresses stories of the bible. I don’t know what’s true and accurate, but for some reason it feels better to me to read stories about Jesus from these pages than it ever did to read about them from the bible, or to hear about Him during sermons and lectures. I don’t know how the biblical references would be received by religious people, but I do know when something feels right to me, and much of what I’m grasping from Daskalos’ teachings feels incredibly right.”

“Some of you may remember Skylab. I don’t. I was just a few months old. Regardless, it’s fascinating reading about Daskalos working with advanced extraterrestrials to change its trajectory so that it wouldn’t land on highly populated areas of the planet. The story’s exciting to me for two reasons. It’s not because I’m into aliens or astronomy, but because it happened around the time I was born. This is a big story the world was talking about while I was taking my first breath of chicken-soup-infused air, and getting to grips with having fingers and vocal cords. But the other reason I can’t unglue myself from the pages is because the space station was, at one point, headed toward Canada, and yes, I know that Canada is big, but Daskalos doesn’t specify which part of the country would have been affected, so my imagination goes right to the place to which I eventually emigrated from Poland.

“We all choose to look at this (and all other) situations in our own ways. My way is this: I’m reading a book about a man who worked very hard on that hot summer’s day of July 11, 1979 to change the course of Earth’s history so that my story could bring me here, to this moment, right now. I wonder how much I played a part in his choice.”

“In a past life, I believe I was stoned to death for revealing too much of who I was. I believe this is why I am always hiding parts of myself to most everyone. This is what I believe. Perhaps that is why it is part of my experience, and perhaps it is the reason for my experience. Either way, it is my perception.

“There are not many things in this world that make sense to me. Oftentimes, the world feels cold, abrasive and not at all like the way I thought it would be. Maybe that’s why I was so reluctant to come back this time.

“But amongst all the disconnection, there are moments in this life when I feel I am given permission to return home from the battlegrounds and reconnect with Source, but not through the sort of meditation my yoga teachers teach, but by learning about another person who sees the world similarly to me.

“This book has not once, but twice, shared with me the beauty of its message. It has held me within its comforting, etheric embrace and reassured me that there’s more to it all than I remember.”

2 Comments

  1. Jon Daskalos says:

    “Dr Markides is a great story-teller and readers were mesmerized by the fascinating answers of Father Maximos’ (beloved Metropolitan Athanasios of Lemesos,Cyprus ). Markides’ observations and mystical meanderings take prominent place in his book. Definitely not ‘a factual pilgrimage into the heart of Orthodoxy or Christian spirituality. In his search for spiritual truths Markides merely expresses his personal tribulations and explorations of Orthodoxy and views on spirituality.
    An essay by Paul Skorpen – A Mystic Mistaken for a Magus (Theosis.com) might help Professor Markides find his way home.
    It was Kyriacos’ unquenchable thirst for discovery that brought him to Daskalos’ doorstep. Daskalos welcomed his fellow countryman as an observer and reporter of the Teachings, but under one condition: “‘You can write about the teachings if you wish, assuming that I do not get the credit,’ he said quietly.” Kyriacos’ enthusiasm for the new found and far-flung fields, of mysticism was contagious. He moved through Daskalos’ world like a kid-in-a-candy-shop, sharing with us all the splendors and the delights he could pull off the shelves. Markides’ books were well received by an audience hungry for a rich Western spiritual path. The Magus is valued by many as a classic of mystical literature. Through the lively and accurate account many of us were assured, if not awakened, by Daskalos’ immense grace and guidance.
    Yet Markides had swiftly lost the trust of Daskalos: Kyriacos went well beyond the boundaries he was given, and wrote extensively about Daskalos powers, feats, and personal life. He had been instructed to limit his writings to the Magus, and when I asked him why he ignored Daskalos’ wish, he stated; ‘People wanted more after The Magus; they wanted to learn more about the Teachings and about Daskalos.’ He was right enough, but in betraying and portraying Daskalos in this matter ? as an object of admiration and fascination ? he began to distance himself from the teacher and the deeper message that comes with patience and perseverance.
    For himself, Daskalos was determined not to be honored at the expense of the message. He had no need for genuflection or subservience. He guarded against engaging in ritual and form that threatened to displace the work and the spirit. Daskalos was so humbled by the enormity of the truth, that pride had little power to make him complacent. For Markides (and most of us) it is another matter.
    It is said that a messenger who brings foreboding news is often slain, while a heralder of promising news is celebrated. In either case the messenger is confused with the message. Markides was recognized as the next Ouspensky or Castaneda, wined and dined by esoteric circles, and understandably intoxicated by the attention. By nature Kyriacos is a good hearted and well intentioned man, and as the attention began to overwhelm Daskalos’ private life (with scores from the world-over knocking at his door day and night), Markides conjured up an organization designed to protect the Teacher. Erevna (a Greek word for research) was to orchestrate the Teachings and the teachers. Daskalos, who at first approved of the scheme, became uneasy with what was unfolding before his eyes. As a student of esoteric-systems-turned-spiritual-organizations gone awry (‘And they all do sooner or later’, warned Daskalos), Daskalos lent his blessing to Erevna, but decided to continue to work independently. Erevna, which had imagined Daskalos as the head of the system, with Kostas (a student of Daskalos’ for 20 years) as a successor, and with Markides serving as a president ? had suffered a great blow. Feelings were hurt, and the tide began to shift. Markides had fashioned himself as an innocent participant observer with no personal ambitions nor designs. But his books began to take a very different tone. Kostas, who had been first described as ‘light-years behind Daskalos’ in ability and development, had suddenly become an ‘equal’ by the time Fire in the Heart was published. (I hold Kostas in a certain esteem ? having attended his lessons for over a year during my stay in Cyprus ? but find his style and message to be of a whole other brand than Daskalos’.) Hurt and confused, Markides and Kostas began to slur Daskalos: accusing the teacher of everything from black-magic to sexual misadventures (ready-made charges that Daskalos faced his entire life from vindictive and insecure figures in the Orthodox church).
    It befuddled many to see such seemingly human behavior coming from such elevated men. I have been many times asked, ‘Why has a separation occurred? Why so much ill-will?’ Knowing all the parties involved, I propose that there are two possible explanations; one earthly and one spiritual.
    The earthly: With the advent of Markides’ books came a whole slew of earthly temptations (e.g. fame, fortune and power), that enticed various members of a previously esoteric society. There are people who succumb to temptation, still less who resist, and far fewer who stand beyond the fray. Daskalos, I contend, could be neither flatter nor funded.
    The spiritual: Kostas (pseudo-name in Markides books) is Kikis L. Christofides – Chairman of the Famagusta Association of Greek Cypriot Refugees, Cyprus ) studied with Daskalos for over twenty years, and Daskalos was not the sort of teacher to push his students away to become teachers. Therefore, the separation between Daskalos and Kostas needed to be dramatic, even traumatic to be decisive. After the separation Daskalos would teach for another 6 years ? a half dozen more years that Kostas would have lingered in Daskalos’ shadow. Daskalos was indeed proud that Kostas had begun to teach on his own (if not also saddened that a separation occurred in the process).
    Markides published a tract in Riding with the Lion, in which he promises to take the reader into the riches of Orthodox mysticism, but instead spends endless pages seeking to discredit Daskalos with obfuscate, opaque and suggestive charges. It is difficult to bring to mind a single esoteric or exoteric spiritual tradition that fails to warn us against engaging in gossip and slander. Markides encourages his readers to use their imaginations to speculate about a master’s supposed transgression. We live in cultures that are relieved to hear of ‘fallen masters’ (so as to excuse our own spiritual sluggishness). Markides, who once told me, ‘I created Daskalos; without me he would be nothing,’ was now intent on bringing down the messenger. A self-fancied king maker, Markides turned into a king breaker We had cheerfully followed Markides as the kid-in-a candy-shop, and now he was moving about like a bull-in-a-china-shop, as he ran rampant through the great traditions East and West.
    Markides is known to say that Daskalos teachings are not unique, that they are simply patterned on the universal truth. This implies that anyone can recite the Buddha’s eight fold path or Christ’s Sermon on the Mount and become a great spiritual teacher. But teaching is far more a matter of presence and persuasion than it is of recitations. Daskalos was a sage and a seer; hardly a sophist. He was a powerful teacher, a true messenger, because he modeled his life on that of Jesus Christ. Daskalos taught and healed with a blend of power, wisdom and love that is rare for this world.
    Markides played an instrumental role in bringing the message of Daskalos to the world ? a message clearly illustrating that we have in Christianity a rich and full path to truth. But Markides packaged Daskalos as a ‘Magus’, focused on his psychic gifts, and failed, I believe, to see the great depths of a timeless Christian mystic. Those who had the good fortune to see Daskalos teach in person, had first to shed the image of Daskalos that Markides created. Only then could they behold a very rare and beautiful man.
    Because narrow is the gate and difficult is the way which leads to life, and there are few who find it.

  2. Paul says:

    Markides’ Daskalos
    A Mystic mistaken for a Magus
    ________________________________________

    By Paul Skorpen
    Munich, Germany

    As a student at the University of Maine in the mid-1980’s I remember my excitement when enrolling in the courses taught by the Cyprus born Professor of sociology, Kyriacos Markides. Kyriacos is a passionate teacher, blending deep study with a probing curiosity. It was Kyriacos’ unquenchable thirst for discovery that brought him to Daskalos’ doorstep. Daskalos welcomed his fellow countryman as an observer and reporter of the Teachings, but under one condition: “‘You can write about the teachings if you wish, assuming that I do not get the credit,’ he said quietly.” (The Magus of Strovolos, page. 7).
    Kyriacos’ enthusiasm for the new found, and far-flung fields, of mysticism was contagious. He moved through Daskalos’ world like a kid-in-a-candy-shop, sharing with us all the splendors and the delights he could pull off the shelves. Markides’ books were well received by an audience hungry for a rich Western spiritual path. The Magus is valued by many as a classic of mystical literature. Through the lively and accurate account many of us were assured, if not awakened, by Daskalos’ immense grace and guidance.
    Yet Markides had swiftly lost the trust of Daskalos: Kyriacos went well beyond the boundaries he was given, and wrote extensively about Daskalos powers, feats, and personal life. He had been instructed to limit his writings to the Magus, and when I asked him why he ignored Daskalos’ wish, he stated; ‘People wanted more after The Magus; they wanted to learn more about the Teachings and about Daskalos.’ He was right enough, but in betraying and portraying Daskalos in this matter ‹ as an object of admiration and fascination ‹ he began to distant himself from the teacher and the deeper message that comes with patience and perseverance.
    ________________________________________

    It is said that a messenger who brings foreboding news is often slain,
    while a heralder of promising news is celebrated:
    in either case the messenger is confused with the message.
    ________________________________________
    For himself, Daskalos was determined not to be honored at the expense of the message. He had no need for genuflection or subservience. He guarded against engaging in ritual and form that threatened to displace the work and the spirit. Daskalos was so humbled by the enormity of the truth, that pride had little power to make him complacent. For Markides (and most of us) it is another matter.
    It is said that a messenger who brings foreboding news is often slain, while a heralder of promising news is celebrated. In either case the messenger is confused with the message. Markides was recognized as the next Ouspensky or Castaneda, wined and dined by esoteric circles, and understandably intoxicated by the attention. By nature Kyriacos is a good hearted and well intentioned man, and as the attention began to overwhelm Daskalos’ private life (with scores from the world-over knocking at his door day and night), Markides conjured up an organization designed to protect the Teacher. Erevna (a Greek word for research) was to orchestrate the Teachings and the teachers. Daskalos, who at first approved of the scheme, became uneasy with what was unfolding before his eyes. As a student of esoteric-systems-turned-spiritual-organizations gone awry (‘And they all do sooner or later’, warned Daskalos), Daskalos lent his blessing to Erevna, but decided to continue to work independently. Erevna, which had imagined Daskalos as the head of the system, with Kostas (a student of Daskalos’ for 20 years) as a the successor, and with Markides serving as a president ‹ had suffered a great blow. Feelings were hurt, and the tide began to shift. Markides had fashioned himself as a innocent participant observer with no personal ambitions nor designs. But his books began to take a very different tone. Kostas, who had been first described as ‘light-years behind Daskalos’ in ability and development, had suddenly become an ‘equal’ by the time Fire in the Heart was published. (I hold Kostas in a certain esteem ‹ having attended his lessons for over a year during my stay in Cyprus ‹ but find his style and message to be of a whole other brand than Daskalos’.) Hurt and confused, Markides and Kostas began to slur Daskalos: accusing the teacher of everything from black-magic to sexual misadventures (ready-made charges that Daskalos faced his entire life from vindictive and insecure figures in the Orthodox church).
    It befuddled many to see such seemingly human behavior coming from such elevated men. I have been many times asked, ‘Why has a separation occurred? Why so much ill-will?’ Knowing all the parties involved, I propose that there are two possible explanation; one earthly and one spiritual.
    1. The earthly: With the advent of Markides’ books came a whole slew of earthly temptations (e.g. fame, fortune and power), that enticed various members of a previously esoteric society. There are people who succumb to temptation, still less who resist, and far fewer who stand beyond the fray. Daskalos, I contend, could be neither flatter nor funded.

    2. The spiritual: Kostas had studied with Daskalos for over twenty years, and Daskalos was not the sort of teacher to push his students away to become teachers. Therefore, the separation between Daskalos and Kostas needed to be dramatic, even traumatic to be decisive. After the separation Daskalos would teach for another 6 years ‹ a half dozen more years that Kostas would have lingered in Daskalos’ shadow. Daskalos was indeed proud that Kostas had begun to teach on his own (if not also saddened that a separation occurred in the process).

    In my six year long stay with Daskalos (during which I was closer to the teacher than anyone outside of the family) I never witnessed any event or intention that would substantiate the wanton and reckless charges suggested by the people of Erevna.
    More recently Markides published a tract called Riding with the Lion, in which he promises to take the reader into the riches of Orthodox mysticism, but instead spends endless pages seeking to discredit Daskalos with obfuscate, opaque and suggestive charges. It is difficult to bring to mind a single esoteric or exoteric spiritual tradition that fails to warn us against engaging in gossip and slander. Markides encourages his readers to use their imaginations to speculate about a master’s supposed transgression. We live in cultures that are relived to hear of ‘fallen masters’ (so as to excuse our own spiritual sluggishness). Markides, who once told me, ‘I created Daskalos; without me he would be nothing,’ was now intent on bringing down the messenger. A self-fancied king maker, Markides turned into a king breaker We had cheerfully followed Markides as the kid-in-a candy-shop, and now he was moving about like a bull-in-a-china-shop, as he ran rampant through the great traditions East and West.
    ________________________________________

    We had cheerfully followed Markides as the kid-in-a-candy-shop,
    and now he was moving about like a bull-in-a-china-shop,
    as he ran rampant through the great traditions East and West.
    ________________________________________

    Markides is known to say that Daskalos teachings are not unique, that they are simply patterned on the universal truth. This implies that anyone can recite the Buddha’s eight fold path or Christ’s Sermon on the Mount and become a great spiritual teacher. But teaching is far more a matter of presence and persuasion than it is of recitations. Daskalos was a sage and a seer; hardly a sophist. He was a powerful teacher, a true messenger, because he modeled his life on that of Jesus Christ. Daskalos taught and healed with a blend of power, wisdom and love that is rare for this world.
    Many of us, whose lives were transformed by Daskalos and his message, are indebted to Markides for his books. Markides played an instrumental role in bringing the message of Daskalos to the world ‹ a message clearly illustrating that we have in Christianity a rich and full path to truth. But Markides packaged Daskalos as a ‘Magus’, focused on his psychic gifts, and failed, I believe, to see the great depths of a timeless Christian mystic. Those who had the good fortune to see Daskalos teach in person, had first to shed the image of Daskalos that Markides created. Only then could they behold a very rare and beautiful man.

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